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Nick Zoids




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  Design 13
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The language; both vernacular and visual, of
pop culture, (computer games, blockbuster films, music videos and advertising), is explored within this series. These bold, colorful, typographic works arrested in motion could easily have been lifted from a computer game intro sequence sometime between the 1980’s and today. This draws a line between the seemingly benign arcade games of the late 70’s, early 80’s such as Space Invaders, to a time where both the language and technologies of war and entertainment are merging or in some cases; have already. US Military Recruitment arcades, strategically set up near shopping malls encourage youths to play ‘shoot-em-up’ games whilst recruitment officers meet and greet them. Remote control wars are now played out with the use of drones and the like. Combatants can today wage war abroad and be only a short drive away from home, the mall, and the children’s school.

The dialogue seen here; is lifted directly from the WikiLeaks release – Collateral Murder; where two unarmed journalists lost their lives to U.S. Helicopter gunfire. The U.S. operative’s dialogue forms the basis of these works.

The repetition of these images; adding to the volume of colour and movement; at first might appear overwhelming but ultimately may reach saturation point; a stage of desensitization for the spectator. This in turn mimics the processes of the mainstream media output and audience consumption of high impact news stories. Further it may well act as a metaphor for the manner in which an audience consumes war footage, advertising and games upon the same screen; often with an instant switch and without any lasting emotional resonance.